Poetry: Wanting

WW1 Photo: Third Battle of Ypres @ Passchendaele. This image inspired the poem below “Wanting”.

Wanting

Can you grasp the appeal
of shipyard steel?
Can you see the gunners
sweating in their turrets,
the tarmac crowded with runners?

The war is here,
the war is here!

Did you see
how the ocean buried the dead
while the weight of war
buried the living
across the entire globe?

Do you ever have the memory
of manifest destiny?
Can you imagine how the horsemen
were gripped and held
with the swooning of matrimony
the first time their eyes
met the virgin plains?

Could you watch it all over again…
how the honest leer of ownership
crossed even the gentlest soul’s visage?
Would you watch the buffalo stumble
before the thunderstick,
the red man before the white man…
the loves of all of them
bleeding out onto the field
in search of redemption?

Do the maginot lines
ever separate you from the easiness of now?

Can you imagine the loss
of Passchendaele
with nothing but fog,
the cries of mudded men and
denuded tree trunks
to navigate by?
Do you count your blessings
the way they counted bodies
in the Somme
as the fevered young
crested the trench
only to find themselves
suddenly lifeless
and stacked upon their brethren?

Ah, and the futility we experience
when we try to make sense
of the Battle of Verdun
the redundancy of
endless, endless man’s
wanting
          wanting
                     wanting.

(Note: I penned this perhaps a year or so ago.  If you’ve never researched nor studied the WWI Battles of the Somme or Passchendaele, Verdun…they are noteworthy examples of the madness of mankind…how much horror we can create and then march into the teeth of, for reasons we cannot accurately explain)

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About skymeetingtheground

Healer, poet, author, yogi, single father...outdoorsy guy.
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3 Responses to Poetry: Wanting

  1. Mike & Sarah says:

    A magnificant poem with strong imagery and emotive language. I particularly like the ending rerain which disappears into the white of the page like a ghostly echo – very cleaver. The author leaves an impression on both imagination and senses, while at the same time making socilogical and psychological comments about the nature of man… Impressive

    Like

  2. Mike & Sarah says:

    A magnificant poem with strong imagery and emotive language. I particularly like the ending rerain which disappears into the white of the page like a ghostly echo – very cleaver. The author leaves an impression on both imagination and senses, while at the same time making socilogical and psychological comments about the nature of man… Impressive!

    Like

  3. Mike & Sarah says:

    A magnificant poem with strong imagery and emotive language. I particularly like the ending rerain which disappears into the white of the page like a ghostly echo – very cleaver. The author leaves an impression on both imagination and senses, while at the same time making socilogical and psychological comments about the nature of man… Impressive!!! Well said!

    Like

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